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Call for Papers

In this section, you will find opportunities related to submissions of articles, chapters or books. The opportunities listed under the section 'Religion and Diversity Project' are opportunities that are either directly related to the Religion and Diversity Project or led by team members. In the 'Other' category, you will find other opportunities that are not related to the Religion and Diversity Project. Click on the links provided to learn more about those opportunities.


Religion and Diversity Project Opportunities

Boundaries of Religious Freedom

Edited by Lori G. Beaman (University of Ottawa), Lene Kühle (Aarhus University) and Anna Halafoff (Deakin University)

Announcing the new Springer Book Series, Boundaries of Religious Freedom: Regulating Religion in Diverse Societies. Book proposals are invited for research monographs and edited collections. Find out more about this opportunity.

International Studies in Religion and Society

Edited by Lori G. Beaman and Peter Beyer, University of Ottawa 

The Brill series, International Studies in Religion and Society (ISRS), publishes social scientific volumes that focus critically on research, debates, and theories in the forms, role, and relations of religion in contemporary society. Book proposals are invited for volumes directed at a broad audience, research monographs and edited collections. To find out more about this opportunity and how to submit proposals, please click here.

Other Opportunities

Journals are listed in alphabetical order.

Comparative Islamic Studies

The journal Comparative Islamic Studies is inviting colleagues to submit articles for publication. It is a refereed journal that is published twice a year and the timeline for peer review and publication is in the range of 3-4 months. Colleagues interested in guest editing an issue on a topic or to publish the proceedings of a conference are also welcomed.

Comparative Islamic Studies focuses on integrating Islamic studies into the more general theoretical and methodological boundaries of liberal arts disciplines with an emphasis on those disciplines most closely aligned with the contemporary study of religion (e.g. anthropology, art history, classics, comparative literature, history, philosophy, political science, psychology and sociology). Particular attention will be given to articles and reviews which reflect how Islamic materials can challenge and contribute to generic categories, theories and questions of method in the general study of religion. The journal provides the opportunity for expert scholars of Islam to demonstrate the more general significance of their research both to comparativists and to specialists working in other areas.

Articles are to be explicitly comparative in their focus and scope, and should clearly articulate both the reasons for selecting to compare certain phenomena and the theoretical conclusions to be drawn from the comparison. Comparisons may be between Islamic and non-Islamic materials or within and among Islamic materials. Some examples include analyses of Bible and Quran along with Jewish, Christian and Muslim exegesis; studies of rituals, canonical texts, myths, and ideeologies; sociological categories investigating prophet figures, holy people, saints and sufis; and comparisons of theology, philosophy and mysticism.

Attention to Islamic materials from outside the central Arabic lands is of special interest, as are comparisons which stress the diversity of Islam as it interacts with changing human conditions. Articles may also concentrate on the methodological and theoretical implications of doing comparative analysis.

Please visit the website for more information and to submit your articles: https://www.equinoxpub.com/journals/index.php/CIS

GOLEM: Journal of Religion and Monsters

GOLEM: Journal of Religion and Monsters is a forum for scholars from a variety of disciplines to share their thoughts about ...monsters, religion and belief. This involves a remarkable diversity of approaches, topics and fields of interests that confirms monsters are significant in a broad array of interdisciplinary areas, including religious studies, folklore, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, theology, and sociology. 

GOLEM: Journal of Religion and Monsters is currently accepting scholarly articles on topics related to religion and monsters.

Submissions using methodology from a variety of fields are welcome. The editors maintain a broad definition of religion as culture, but the connection to religion should be clear in all submissions. Articles are peer-reviewed.

Submission Guidelines for GOLEM:

Limit papers to 7,000 words in length.
Include a 100 word abstract at the beginning of the submission.
Number all paragraphs in the following format: [1], [2], etc.
Use MLA format for endnotes and bibliography.

Submit manuscripts as Microsoft Word attachments and send to ruby_ramji@cbu.ca, using "GOLEM" as the subject line.

Or, send as a paper copy to:

Rubina Ramji
Religious Studies
Cape Breton University
1250 Grand Lake Road
Sydney, Nova Scotia

Founding Editor:

Frances Flannery, Ph.D.,
Department of Philosophy and Religion, James Madison University

Senior Editors:

Rubina Ramji
Religious Studies, Cape Breton University

Heather Shipley
University of Ottawa

Book Review Editor:

Kim Paffenroth
Professor of Religious Studies, Iona College

For more information, please click here


Journal of Culture and Religion 

Journal of Culture and Religion is open to submissions from fields of religious and cultural studies. Cultural studies are understood in their widest sense and encompass media and cultural studies, women’s studies, history, music studies, identity studies, etc. The founding research questions this journal will address are: how religion and culture affect our everyday lives and how history affects the present.The Journal wants to explore plurality of influences in fields of religion and culture that form our daily lives. Epistemological foundation of the journal is rejection of meta-narratives, and generation of knowledge and increasing of understanding of these complex issues. All papers are subject to two blind peer-reviews, and papers have to be proofread. Papers that do not follow these guidelines can be rejected. Depending on the topic of the paper, the evaluation process might take several months. Please, be patient. Journal will consider individually submitted papers, as well as conference papers from conferences organised by the Centre for Research in Social Sciences and Humanities. In the latter, contributors will have to edit their papers for publication in the journal. Journal will be assigned international ISSN number by Croatian National and University Library. ISSN number will be assigned after submitting table of contents for the first number (pre-approval obtained). Journal will be published as an online, open access, journal in the first instance. When funding will be obtained, it will be published in print form too. We are working on obtaining funding for the print version.

Submissions guidelines

All articles must be the author’s original work, previously unpublished, and not being reviewed for publication with another journal. After submission, the article will be peer-reviewed by qualified academics in the field. Based on this evaluation, you will receive one of the following responses: accepted as it is, accepted after minor revision, accepted after major revision, rejected. Responses will be accompanied by the reviewer’s comments and reasons for the decision (if negative). We will publish original papers (research and theoretical), review papers, essays, and book reviews. All papers must be formatted to Times New Roman, size 12, no line spacing, and must have a complete list of references of all sources cited. Papers should not be longer than 7,000-8,000 words (including footnotes, but excluding references). Papers should have abstracts of approximately 100 words, and up to 5 keywords. Abstracts should be written as a brief summary of the key points of the article. If you are using copyrighted material, please provide a copy of permission to use the material. Papers will be subject to two (2) blind peer reviews. Please, remove obvious remarks that can identify the author of the article (i.e. As I have argued before (XY, year)).

Please send papers to: info@socialsciencesandhumanities.com  

Journal of Social Inclusion - Special Issue on Religious Diversity and Social Inclusion 

Special Issue Title: Religious Diversity and Social Inclusion

Guest Editor:

Gary D. Bouma
Emeritus Professor of Sociology, UNESCO Chair in Interreligious and Intercultural Relations-Asia Pacific, Monash University, Australia
E-Mail: gary.bouma@monash.edu

Deadline for Abstracts: 30 June 2015
Deadline for Full Papers: 31 October 2015
Publication of the Special Issue: April 2016


As societies have become religiously diverse in ways and extents not familiar in the recent histories of most, the issues of how to include this diversity, how to manage it, that is, how to be a religiously diverse society have come to the fore. As a result religion has become part of the social policy conversation in new ways. This special issue of Social Inclusion explores these issues of social inclusion in both particular settings and in cross-national comparative studies by presenting research and critical thought on this critical issue facing every society today. Social inclusion refers to the processes, structures and policies instituted by a society to promote the degree of social cohesion required to be sufficiently productive to achieve sustainability. Each society does this but often in quite different ways. Some see control and the enforcement of a dominant ideology as critical, others see the release of creative energies enabled by greater freedom to be the best way. There are other mixed modes and may be ways yet to be described. Religious diversity has been seen to challenge social cohesion both in classical sociology emerging in a Europe redolent with memories of violent conflict among religious groups and the violent imposition of religious order. Maintaining religious homogeneity is not an option for most societies today. There is no single answer to the social inclusion of many religions. Moreover, as religion continues to be or re-enters the field of social policy it does so in four basic ways—as an object of policy, as a source of policy, as an implementer of policy and as a critic of policy. 

Keywords: interreligious relations; multiculturalism; multi-faith; religion; religions and violence; religious diversity; social cohesion; social control; social inclusion; social policy

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this Special Issue are asked to consult the journal's editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to Mr. António Vieira (antonio.vieira@cogitatiopress.com) by 30 June 2015. Authors are also kindly asked to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication costs.

For more information: 


Migration Studies

Migration Studies showcases scholarship that builds connections across the distinctive field of migration studies. Migration Studies welcomes high quality research on human migration in all its manifestations, and particularly work that presents:

Reviewers are asked to evaluate whether or not submissions meet at least one of these criteria. 

All submissions are reviewed through a Global Editorial Board of leading migration scholars in Anthropology, Demography, Economics, Forced Migration Studies, Geography, History, Psychology, Political Science, International Relations, and Sociology. 

The journal welcomes research that is anchored in a discipline whilst also engaging across disciplinary boundaries with other migration researchers.

To learn more about this new journal or to submit an article, please click here

New Secular Studies Book Series, NYU Press



There are more secular people in the world than ever before. And various forms and manifestations of secularity—atheism, agnosticism, humanism, skepticism, and anti-religious movements—are enjoying increased attention and scrutiny. The scholarly examination of secular identity, secular groups, secular culture(s), and political/constitutional secularisms—and how these all relate to each other, as well as to the broader social world—is thus more timely than ever. Moreover, studying secularism also teaches us about religiosity; as secularism is almost always in reaction to or in dialogue with the religious, by studying those who are secular we can learn much, from a new angle, about the religion they are rejecting.

The Secular Studies series is meant to provide a home for works in the emerging field of secular studies. Rooted in a social science perspective, it will explore and illuminate various aspects of secular life, ranging from how secular people live their lives and how they construct their identities to the activities of secular social movements, from the demographics of secu- larism to the ways in which secularity intersects with other social processes, identities, patterns, and issues.

Call for paper

Open Access book - New Religious Movements

De Gruyter Open, a part of De Gruyter publishing group, invites book proposals for the new Open Access book series on New Religious Movements.

The series welcomes written or edited monographs and anthologies on new religious movements (NRMs) and alternative spiritualities – both empirical and theoretical with interdisciplinary approaches. Of particular interest are those that combine perspectives and methods drawn from all social sciences and humanities on the present, historical and newly emerging NRMs, as well as research methods, issues and problems, and new directions in study of NRMs.

More information about the series to be found at: http://degruyteropen.com/oatheologynrm/

Rasa Pranskeviciute, PhD
Series Editor, OA New Religious Movements
T +48 22 701 50 15


Find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/DeGruyterOpen

Subscribe our Newsletters and Alerts: www.degruyter.com/newsletter

Open Theology - Psychotherapy and Religious Values

Open Theology (http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/opth) invites submissions for the topical issue "Psychotherapy and Religious Values", under the general editorship of Prof. P. Scott Richards (Brigham Young University).

In 1980, Allen E. Bergin, published a landmark article “Psychotherapy and religious values” in the Journal of Clinical and Consulting Psychology. The article, which became a citation classic, produced intense interest, enthusiasm, and controversy in the psychology profession. Ultimately, it helped energize an international movement to bring religious perspectives into mainstream psychology and psychotherapy. Great progress has been made during the past 35 years in this effort, but more work remains to be done. The focus of this special issue of Open Theology is to commemorate the publication of Bergin’s 1980 article by affirming the progress that has been made and exploring directions for the future in the movement to bring religious values and spiritual perspectives into mainstream psychotherapy. Manuscripts with a theoretical, historical, theological, empirical, and/or clinical focus will all be considered for the special issue. For empirical studies, a variety of research methodologies are encouraged, including experimental, practice-based evidence, process, case reports, single-N, and qualitative designs.

How to submit:

Submissions are due by December 31, 2015. To submit an article for the special issue of Open Theology, please use the on-line submission system http://www.editorialmanager.com/openth/  choosing as article type:  ‘Special Issue Article: Psychotherapy and Religious Values'.

All contributions will undergo a critical review before being accepted for publication.

Further questions about the thematic issue can be sent to P. Scott Richards at scott_richards@byu.edu. In case of technical questions or problems please contact Managing Editor of the journal Katarzyna Tempczyk at katarzyna.tempczyk@degruyteropen.com.

Open Theology - Religion and Racism - Intercultural Perpsectives

Open Theology invites submissions for the topical issue "Religion and Racism - Intercultural Perspectives," under the general editorship of Daniel White Hodge (North Park University).

The area of religion and racism presents a dearth of scholarship which critically examines the role of racism, even more so, institutional racism, within religion. Religiously speaking, God talk and rhetoric plays an uncanny role on both sides of justice-seeking and continued violence. For example, Darren Wilson—the police officer accused of the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO — claimed it was “God’s will”, while protesters and activists on the ground claim God as being “on their side.” Is God “another White cop waiting to beat my ass,” as the rapper and Hip Hop prophet Tupac Shakur poignantly suggested? Does religion, more generally, have a role in spreading racism? And, what role has God-rhetoric played in racial injustice in cities such as Ferguson in the U.S., and around the world?

Therefore, we invite submission addressing one or more of these questions or issues. Although we welcome papers speaking to other topics related to religion and racism, some possible featured issues are as follows:

  • The problem of religion and racism in history (e.g. missionary movements; colonialism; how missionaries saw ethnic minorities)
  • Racism in official statements of faith communities
  • The effect of White Western evangelistic movements on various countries (e.g. China, Kenya, Nigeria)
  • Emerging religions that openly criticize the hegenomic religious establishments
  • Sacred texts and the interpretation of them in evil-doing (e.g. slavery)

Some potential – but certainly not to limit - questions to consider are:

  • Does the color of God’s skin matter?
  • What is the significance of racial rhetoric within religious discourse?
  • How ought religion and race be theorized and discussed? What role do they play? In which lives do they matter? What role does the sacred/profane binary play as a rhetorical strategy and political designator?
  • How has media shaped religious and racial perceptions in the public sphere in Ferguson, Baltimore and beyond? How has Black rage been projected in these spaces? What does religion have to do with this?

We welcome essays critically exploring such questions and issues from multiple perspectives, approaches and methods of analyses.

How to submit:

Submissions are due January 31, 2016. To submit an article for the special issue of Open Theology, authors are asked to access the on-line submission system at:http://www.editorialmanager.com/openth/

Further questions about this thematic issue can be addressed to Daniel White Hodge atdwhodge@northpark.edu. In case of technical questions, please contact journal Managing Editor Katarzyna Tempczyk at katarzyna.tempczyk@degruyteropen.com.


Performing Islam

The journal, which is rigorously peer-reviewed, invites submissions that pursue the methods and methodologies by which we attempt to approach original research in Islam in performance studies, and the study of the performativity inherent in the Islam-related cultural production. Contributions which share research interests and experiences in interrelated areas of performative, homeland and diasporic negotiations, and the complexities of contemporary Islam are particularly welcomed.The journal is uniquely positioned to disseminate the groundbreaking work of genuinely international dimensions. Articles that encourage challenging debate on problem areas within this new developing field are also welcomed to the journal's open forum, as are high quality articles usually published as peripheral items in journals from other disciplines. Proposals for special or themed issues will be considered.

To learn more about this new journal or to submit an article, please click here.

Religion Beat - Religion in the Public Sphere Initiative

The University of Toronto’s Religion in the Public Sphere initiative is proud to present Religion Beat, an online publication that occupies the space between a blog and an academic journal. To readers inside and outside of the academy, it is a curated collection of articles from writers passionate and knowledgeable about religion in society. To writers, and particularly to young scholars, it is a forum for sharing interests and expertise with a broader audience while maintaining a commitment to intellectual writing.

Academic and non-academic articles relating to religion in the public sphere are welcome, as well as book reviews or responses to public talks, community events, conferences or current affairs. The Religion Beat podcast series is also accepting proposals for topics, panels or interviews.

For more information, please click here.


Religious Engagement in Democratic Politics Book Series

Temple University Press

The Religious Engagement in Democratic Politics series will collect work that explores in theoretically and empirically rigorous ways variations in and determinants of religious presence in the politics of democratic nations — from those with a long history of institutionalized democracy to those struggling to establish free, contested elections and systems of rights and liberties. Books in the series will demonstrate application of one or more of a variety of quantitative and qualitative methodologies to explore the robust and highly variable presence of religion in democracies.

If you have a manuscript or an idea for a manuscript that would be a good fit for this series, please contact me by email at djupe@denison.edu.

Religious Studies and Theology

You are invited to submit a paper for possible inclusion in the peer-reviewed international journal Religious Studies and Theology. The journal publishes in June and December; however manuscripts are accepted on a rolling basis throughout the year.

Religious Studies and Theology welcomes original research pertinent to the contemporary world from a range of disciplines, with a particular interest in Canadian perspectives and/or studies of Canada from abroad and in relation to global contexts.

Manuscript submission is easily completed at this link:

Submissions are sent by the Editor to two peer-reviewers in a double-blind process. You will be notified within one week of submission if your manuscript has been sent for review. You will be notified of the decision within approximately three months and will be provided with a copy of reviewer comments.

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Events Calendar
October 2015
June 2015 January 2016

Critical Thinkers Lecture - Jacques Berlinerblau

Thank you to Jacques Berlinerblau (Georgetown University) who gave an excellent lecture on "Secularism: The Misunderstood and Essential-Ism" on October 7, 2015, as part of our 2015-2016 Critical Thinkers in Religion, Law and Social Theory lecture series. The video of this event is now available on our RelDivProject YouTube Channel.


New! Patterns of Governing Religion Website

It is our great pleasure to announce that newly created "Patterns of Governing Religion" website is now live. This collaborative website brings together the results of multiple major research projects from around the world. The various research findings are organized by thematic categories that allow for the centralized access of reports and publications that have been generated on similar topics.  To visit this website, please click here.


E-Journal - Regulating Religion

How and why do new religious movements use the Internet? François Xavier Bauduin's article explores this topic in relation to the Raelian cult. The author explains how the Internet has become a central tool in the recruitment of new members and to promote the cult to the general public. This article received an award for the best student paper at the 2015 International Society for the Sociology of Religion (ISSR) conference.


Religion and Diversity Project Electronic Mailing List

We invite you to stay informed about the events organised by the Religion and Diversity Project by joining our electronic mailing list. Please send us an email at info@religionanddiversity.ca to register.